Projects that are tagged with gaussian process.


Logo Toeblitz Toolkit for Fast Toeplitz Matrix Operations 1.03

by cunningham - August 13, 2014, 02:21:36 CET [ BibTeX Download ] 1968 views, 504 downloads, 2 subscriptions

About: Toeblitz is a MATLAB/Octave package for operations on positive definite Toeplitz matrices. It can solve Toeplitz systems Tx = b in O(n*log(n)) time and O(n) memory, compute matrix inverses T^(-1) (with free log determinant) in O(n^2) time and memory, compute log determinants (without inverses) in O(n^2) time and O(n) memory, and compute traces of products A*T for any matrix A, in minimal O(n^2) time and memory.

Changes:

Adding a write-up in written/toeblitz.pdf describing the package.


Logo JMLR GPstuff 4.5

by avehtari - July 22, 2014, 14:03:11 CET [ Project Homepage BibTeX BibTeX for corresponding Paper Download ] 12087 views, 3162 downloads, 2 subscriptions

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About: The GPstuff toolbox is a versatile collection of Gaussian process models and computational tools required for inference. The tools include, among others, various inference methods, sparse approximations and model assessment methods.

Changes:

2014-07-22 Version 4.5

New features

  • Input dependent noise and signal variance.

    • Tolvanen, V., Jylänki, P. and Vehtari, A. (2014). Expectation Propagation for Nonstationary Heteroscedastic Gaussian Process Regression. In Proceedings of IEEE International Workshop on Machine Learning for Signal Processing, accepted for publication. Preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/1404.5443
  • Sparse stochastic variational inference model.

    • Hensman, J., Fusi, N. and Lawrence, N. D. (2013). Gaussian processes for big data. arXiv preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.6835.
  • Option 'autoscale' in the gp_rnd.m to get split normal approximated samples from the posterior predictive distribution of the latent variable.

    • Geweke, J. (1989). Bayesian Inference in Econometric Models Using Monte Carlo Integration. Econometrica, 57(6):1317-1339.

    • Villani, M. and Larsson, R. (2006). The Multivariate Split Normal Distribution and Asymmetric Principal Components Analysis. Communications in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 35(6):1123-1140.

Improvements

  • New unit test environment using the Matlab built-in test framework (the old Xunit package is still also supported).
  • Precomputed demo results (including the figures) are now available in the folder tests/realValues.
  • New demos demonstrating new features etc.
    • demo_epinf, demonstrating the input dependent noise and signal variance model
    • demo_svi_regression, demo_svi_classification
    • demo_modelcomparison2, demo_survival_comparison

Several minor bugfixes


Logo BayesOpt, a Bayesian Optimization toolbox 0.7.1

by rmcantin - July 3, 2014, 00:30:50 CET [ Project Homepage BibTeX Download ] 7070 views, 1481 downloads, 3 subscriptions

About: BayesOpt is an efficient, C++ implementation of the Bayesian optimization methodology for nonlinear-optimization, experimental design and stochastic bandits. In the literature it is also called Sequential Kriging Optimization (SKO) or Efficient Global Optimization (EGO). There are also interfaces for C, Matlab/Octave and Python.

Changes:

-Added MI criterion

-Simplified Python install

-Fixed bugs in annealed criteria


Logo GP RTSS 1.0

by marc - March 21, 2012, 08:43:52 CET [ BibTeX BibTeX for corresponding Paper Download ] 1667 views, 541 downloads, 1 subscription

About: Gaussian process RTS smoothing (forward-backward smoothing) based on moment matching.

Changes:

Initial Announcement on mloss.org.


About: This local and parallel computation toolbox is the Octave and Matlab implementation of several localized Gaussian process regression methods: the domain decomposition method (Park et al., 2011, DDM), partial independent conditional (Snelson and Ghahramani, 2007, PIC), localized probabilistic regression (Urtasun and Darrell, 2008, LPR), and bagging for Gaussian process regression (Chen and Ren, 2009, BGP). Most of the localized regression methods can be applied for general machine learning problems although DDM is only applicable for spatial datasets. In addition, the GPLP provides two parallel computation versions of the domain decomposition method. The easiness of being parallelized is one of the advantages of the localized regression, and the two parallel implementations will provide a good guidance about how to materialize this advantage as software.

Changes:

Initial Announcement on mloss.org.